​​.​​Tips and Tricks

Waxed Paper Uses­ by Gary Martin
I have found old fashioned waxed paper to be useful for several situations. Its useful to lay
down in areas where I don't want overspray. I've caused myself grief more than once by letting
unobserved paint and glue runs dry to paper or even the bench. With waxed paper this problem
is much easier to deal with. I have also used it to make templates for spraying fish. Nothing
sticks to it!! And its cheap. 

Dampen the noise of your rotary tool by Rich Meeuwenberg
I started carving with a Dremel hanging from a pole in the basement. The flex arm being
relatively short put the tool in a position where I wondered if I wouldn't soon go deaf. I was
able to markedly dampen the noise by inverting  a 5­gal plastic bucket, I cut a slot in the back
so it would slide over the pole encasing the Dremel. The noise really disappeared when I tied a
towel to the pole and  took a piece of an old entry floor mat and glued it to the inside of the
bucket with liquid nails (leave the back slot open so the sound has another exit and you can
remove the bucket as needed). Depending on your situation I'm sure a similar sound proofing
device, divider or board can be made.

Painting Detail On "Tough­to­Paint" Fish by Ed Walicki
When faced with the task of painting fish with intricate spot and vermiculation patterns I often
rely on my 35mm slide projector to lend a hand.  By using a slide image of the same fish and
projecting the image stream of light onto your carving and adjusting the focal length to size the
image to the same size as your carving, you can then lightly pencil in the detail.  I often use
this method when replicating fish for clients that want a carving of a fish they caught and
released and they only have a photo for me to work from.  I slip the photo into a opaque
projector (when using a print or photo, for slides use  a slide projector) and shoot the image
onto a wall covered in white paper.  I then dial in the image to the exact size and trace the
pattern to use for the carving. 

Once the carving is completed and primed white I then project the colored image back onto the
carving and draw in my detail boundaries that I will use to paint the fish.  So in theory, if the
clients fish had 173 spots and one scar.....so will the final paint job.  You would be surprised
what a difference this method can make in your final paint job. 

Knowing how well this works I load my camera with slide film prior to any reference fishing
trips and pose my specimens in poses I often use in my carvings.  This way one fish can
supply a painting template of sorts for any size fish of the same species.  I will shoot for
example, one flat straight pose, one tail up, one tail down.  For a top view, one straight, one
curved left or right (you can always flip the slide for left or right) then maybe a few head close
ups and back into the water they go.  I found slide film has much richer colors than using print
film and ordering slides to made from it. 


Cleaning Diamond & Ruby Burrs by J.R. Scott

If you have a collection or old burrs laying around that have become
gummed up over the years or just want to make your new burrs glisten, drop
them to soak in an ultrasonic cleaner like the type use to clean jewelry.  The
combination of cleaner and ultrasonic waves will clean the cutting surface
and restore their performance.

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On this page I will attempt to provide on a monthly basis some helpful "Tips & Tricks" for you to use or try in your carving adventures. If anyone has an idea or suggestion, tip or trick please e-mail it to me and I will pass it on to our viewers. Thnx's... My e-mail address is ....   omemories@hotmail.com   


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